Systemd defaults KillUserProcesses to ‘yes’ in logind.conf with v230

Isn’t it strange what systemd has done with its latest release version 230 regarding user background process and login sessions? Or is it just me who feels so? Anyway in this post I am going to analyse this change[1] in default setting of logind.conf that upstream has released recently. Let me kick off with the following snippet taken from changelog of v230:

>>> systemd-logind will now by default terminate user processes that are part of the user session scope unit (session-XX.scope) when the user logs out. This behavior is controlled by the KillUserProcesses= setting in logind.conf, and the previous default of “no” is now changed to “yes”. This means that user sessions will be properly cleaned up after, but additional steps are necessary to allow intentionally long-running processes to survive logout. <<<

Click here for complete changes with v230 release.

So what does that mean? I can explain the above change citing the example of GNU Screen. For an average GNU/Linux user it is not an Continue reading

Advertisements

Fedora 22 released with GCC5, Kernel 4.0 and more

f22

Now that Fedora 22(f22) has been released officially, we can all run the latest kernel version i.e, v4.0.4 which is present there by default. This particular post is intended to spread some light over the changes during the transition from fedora 21(f21) to 22. The following points are explained from my experience with the latest version after up-gradation. When version 21 was released, I followed the fedup procedure. Since the up-gradation was successful, I decided to do fedup for version 22 too and it doesn’t disappoint me in any aspect. In fact at first attempt it complained about the lack of disk space on my laptop and I had to do a massive clean-up to recover some free space. I wonder why it requires too much of disk space. Post installation steps were really helpful in building the rpm database so that future errors can be avoided.

DNF or YUM: Do they differ?
I would say no for this question because I couldn’t find any major difference. They could have announced that we are renaming yum to dnf. Instead they made dnf as an advanced yum and for an end-user its pretty much the same thing. One important thing to notice here is that its super fast in resolving the dependencies and parallel downloading of packages. I really loved this improvement as it took more time for yum previously. Being said that, dnf is not Continue reading

Get your update against GNU Bash “SHELLSHOCK” vulnerability

attackers-exploit-shellshock-bug-showcase_image-2-a-7361

This is a very important announcement from FSF [Free Software Foundation]. I would like to share with you, readers, about the unnoticed vulnerability inside Bash [Bourne Again SHell]. Let’s have a look at FSF’s statement on this particular issue.

“A major security vulnerability has been discovered in the free software shell GNU Bash. The most serious issues have already been fixed, and a complete fix is well underway. GNU/Linux distributions are working quickly to release updated packages for their users. All Bash users should upgrade immediately, and audit the list of remote network services running on their systems.”

The vulnerability affects from version 1.14 through 4.3 of GNU Bash. This particular issue is named as Bash Bug.

What if I don’t update?
Continue reading